Art on Paper | New York | March 3 – 6

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Art on Paper | March 3 – 6, 2016

Pier 36, Downtown Manhattan

Booth P2

Michael Steinberg Fine Art / Eminence Grise Editions cordially invites you to Art on Paper | New York. This fair will showcase recent editions by artists Derrick Adams, Lauren Comito, Yevgeniy Fiks and Sandrine Guerin. We are looking forward to seeing you at the fair.

Please visit the following link to get a one day pass.  

PUBLIC FAIR HOURS

Friday, March 4th, 11:00am to 7:00pm

Saturday, March 5th, 11:00am to 7:00pm

Sunday, March 6th, 12:00pm to 6:00pm

Art Fairs during Armory Week 2016

I am very excited to participate in the Art on Paper Fair and SPRING/BREAK Art Show. See either link for further details. See press release below for Shifted Memories at SPRING/BREAK ART SHOW.

SPRING-BREAK2013WEBSITEBANNERBLACKShifted Memories @ SPRING/BREAK Art Show, Room 4118, curated by Fanny Allié and Ketta Ioannidou

Fanny Allié, Chris Bors, Lauren Comito, Caroline Falby, Sofia Hager, Ketta Ioannidou, Melissa Murray

In the exhibition Shifted Memories, the works presented by each of the 6 artists encode, store and recall past recollections. As a metaphor for the human memory process, this act of removing selected data from its original position, copying and pasting it to create a duplicate becomes its own entity, logic and eventually new history.

March 1 – 7, 2016

For more information, to purchase tickets, and to purchase art visit http:// www.springbreakartshow.com/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Shifted Memories

curated by Fanny Allié and Ketta Ioannidou

Fanny Allié, Chris Bors, Lauren Comito, Caroline Falby, Sofia Hager, Ketta Ioannidou, Melissa Murray

We like to think that our memories -recollection of past events – are an accurate record of our history that makes us what we are. A recent neuroscientist’s study (Karim Nader in The Smithsonian Magazine) has shown that the very  act of remembering can change our memories. According to him, it is almost impossible to bring a memory to mind without altering it in some way.

What we think we have experienced in the past may be far from what really happened, the truth slowly morphing into a fake, distorted or re-constructed recollection. Memory would not be an “infinite facsimile” but an ever-changing database, which would create self-forged information that we think are genuine.

In the exhibition “Shifted Memories”, the works presented by each of the 6 artists encode, store and recall past recollections. As a metaphor for the human memory process, this act of removing selected data from its original position, copying and pasting it to create a duplicate becomes its own entity, logic and eventually new history.

In her recent collage work, Fanny Allié tears apart and re-assemble pieces of newsprint images to create characters and habitat structures inspired by her on-going observation of street people in New York City. Chris Bors’s 24 Second Psycho video appropriates the entire Alfred Hitchcock movie Psycho and condenses it into twenty-four seconds. Lauren Comito’s  work utilizes a combination of art making techniques that alternate between digital processes and traditional modes of art making (material manipulations) to create an inventive form of representation by combining everyday moments and ordinary objects. Caroline Falby uses collage as a stream of consciousness technique to investigate her social beliefs and turn them into mix-media drawings and sculptural installations. In her works, Sofia Hager creates an ensemble of unrecognizable and recognizable objects building spaces and stages for figures that often disobey the laws of gravity. Ketta Ioannidou’s digital collages explore the idea of navigating to a place where something new begins, moving towards a source that is constantly moving like a river, but composed of memories. Melissa Murray’s work focuses on the idea of freezing an active moment of thought, her concepts combining multiple environments in one still image.

Future Past Perfect L.A

Future Past Perfect II

LA Invite

 

This traveling exhibition originated at Projekt722 in Brooklyn, and has arrived for its

debut in Los Angeles. The artists in this exhibition, currently live and work on the

East Coast. These artists are tied together by their interest in exploring the historical

progression of totemic forms and seek out new forms for the future. The metaphor

of the artifact that these artists use can range from digital fabrication to ancient

cave painting, haiku to personal artifacts; all reflect an unsentimental awareness of

our circumstances, and consider the basic elements of what might and could be

essential.

 

For more information please contact msbarbersgallery@gmail.com.

SOON Paris Contemporary Editions Art Fair

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Eminence Grise Editions has published four prints from my container series and is exhibiting the prints in Paris from December 11th – 13th. These prints feature interactive QR codes and barcodes.

Pvd low res

Providence Containers, 2015, pigment print on Hot Press with interactive QR codes and barcodes, 20 x 24 in, edition of 18

Salis low res

Salisbury Mills Containers, 2015, pigment print on Hot Press with interactive QR codes and barcodes, 20 x 24 in, edition of 18

Future Past Perfect | Group Exhibition

Future Past Perfect | Group Exhibition

Sleeves

Mary Jones, Sleeves, 2015, oil, silver leaf, spray enamel and X-ray on panel, 20″ x 16″

Future Past Perfect

Nov. 7th – Dec. 13th, 2015 

Featuring works by Michael Ambron, Mary Jones, Rachel Klinghoffer,    

John O’Connor, & Bayne Peterson

Curated by Lauren Comito

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 7th, from 6-9pm

Projekt722 722 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn (Graham L train stop)

The Future Past Perfect indicates that an action will have been completed at some point in the future and simultaneously acknowledges that the action has already taken place. Future actions and forms are recontexualized versions of the past.

These artists are tied together by their interest in exploring the historical progression of totemic forms and seek out the invention of new forms for the future. In Philip K. Dick’s novel “The Man in the High Castle” handmade clay pots become the most valuable relics of a paranoid, fractured culture; a way people could hold on to a trace of their remembered humanity. The artists in Future Past Perfect are similarly invested in the evocation of the earliest signifiers of our human imagination. It is through these hand-created images and objects that we haptically connect, and communicate an empathetic moment through space and time.

As our own technologically driven age becomes one of increasing environmental pressure and cultural fragmentation, volumes of cultural works describing the end of our species have been created, suggesting an apocalypse that is played out with endless variety and circumstances. Clearly, this is something we can imagine. The insistence on materiality and the presence of physical form in these artists’ work suggests a post-apocalyptic present. The metaphor of the artifact that these artists use can range from digital fabrication to ancient cave painting, haiku to personal artifacts; all reflect an unsentimental awareness of our circumstances, and consider the basic elements of what might and could be essential.

Michael Ambron endures varied states of consciousness through his practice of painting; moving away from language and recognition/identification towards the outer margins of sensory perception. He uses the activity of painting to create a distance from the normative modes of engaging with reality, thereby offering the opportunity to experience rich and unusual altered states within his works.

Mary Jones‘ paintings find fragments of human form at the edge of recognition within an abstract process. Eschewing overt figuration, she makes reference to ancient, imaginary sculpture through a layered and intuitive approach. This fragmentation organizes the paintings as a gestalt, intended to evoke a connection with the earliest signifiers of our human imagination.

Rachel Klinghoffer explores an unconventional painting practice that engages with a laborious process of making and collecting. She incorporates personal items that range from lingerie to Hanukkah decorations. These articles evoke her personal connection to femininity, Judaism, romance, and other notions of painting – her works have become specimens, icons, and relics that are poked, prodded, stroked, rubbed, then pulled, torn, and broken apart.

John O’ Connor looks for patterns in the material present in everyday life. His most recent work involves ideas of political and social recurrence – the ways in which class structures are repeated across generations. O’Connor’s work investigates the ways in which information about human behavior is quantified and displayed, as a way to give specific form to the seemingly unexplainable actions people undergo.

Bayne Peterson‘s work is research-based and process-driven, drawing on a variety of narrative, historical moments, aesthetics and ephemera. He explores iterative series that take the form of multiple artifacts presented for study as either scale-shifted representations of the banal or updated modernist gestures. Using 3-D modeling tools within his process, Peterson investigates the limitations and failure of technology to articulate sculptural form.

Lauren Comito is an artist, curator and educator who lives and works in Brooklyn. She dedicates this exhibition to her late professor Frank Bramblett.

*Text written by Ross Klavan and Lauren Comito

New Editions

Lauren Comito: New Editions
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 5th, 2015

Michael Steinberg and Eminence Grise Editions proudly announce the publication of new works by Lauren Comito. Comito’s work incorporates the use of technology and everyday ephemera that is habitually utilized by a mass audience. Specifically her work looks closely at the way images are created, retrieved, circulated and stored.

This body of work is inspired by the correlation between the world of advertising and memory, in particular Edward Bernays’ development of public relations. Employing Sigmund Freud’s writings on psychoanalysis, Bernays paved the way for the world of marketing and advertising through his use of focus groups, which investigated people’s emotional connections to products. Comito mines her own archive of personal digital photography of places she has lived, pairing different packaging containers that came from goods or consumables she associated with that place. Her work alternates between traditional art marking techniques and digital processes. These incorporate barcodes and QR codes that transport the viewer back into the digital realm.

In providing further explanation, Lauren Comito states: “I decided to embed visual QR codes into the prints to incorporate a digital extension to be initiated by the viewer.  Any willing participant can scan these codes to create a further exchange of information, a sort of transaction. The viewer can reflect and project their own narratives onto both the video and physical work before them.”  

The QR codes used by Comito are linked to various types of media, including stop motion animations, image slideshows and video. The barcodes are also linked to the actual products purchased.  QR code and barcode function doubly in Comito’s work, as a gateway to layers of personal history, and as a formal visual pattern.  Comito notes that visual codes of this type have an indeterminate lifespan, which mirrors the ebb and flow of information content in social media.

Lauren Comito currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She received her Masters of Fine Arts in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design. Recent exhibitions include a two-person exhibition at Projekt 722, Brooklyn and a solo exhibition at Slag Gallery, Brooklyn.

Eminence Grise Editions is the publishing division of Michael Steinberg Fine Art. This new venture will continue Michael Steinberg’s long-term commitment to innovative editions by contemporary artists.  Among the recent publications are works by Derrick Adams, Ok Hyun Ahn, Lauren Comito, Yevgeniy Fiks, and Sandrine Guerin.

Philadelphia Containers, 2015, pigment print with QR codes and barcodes on Hot Press, 20 x 24 in, Edition of 18

Philadelphia Containers, 2015, pigment print with QR codes and barcodes on Hot Press, 20 x 24 in, Edition of 18

Editions/Artists’ Books Fair 2015

EAB Fair

This November I am participating in the Editions / Artists’ Books Fair in New York City. I am happy to announce that I will be releasing a limited printed edition, published by Eminence Grise Editions. The fair will take place from November 5th through November 8th.

Fair Schedule VIP + ticket holders
Thursday, Nov. 5th, 6 -9pm FREE
Friday, Nov. 6th 11am – 7pm FREE
Saturday, Nov. 7th, 11am – 7pm FREE
Sunday, Nov. 8th, 11am – 5pm FREE

Brooklyn Containers, 2015, Pigment print on Hot Press with QR codes and barcodes, Paper size: 24 x 20 in, Published by Eminence Grise Editions, Edition of 18